10-Aug-20 Abuse in Religious Organisations

On 5 August 2020, the BBC reported leaked excerpts from a forthcoming report by independent investigator Vicky Lawson-Brown into abuse of women and children within the ‘Jesus Army’ or ‘Jesus Fellowship’. Established in 1969 at a chapel in Northamptonshire, the Jesus Army grew quickly, drawing in the homeless and substance misusers, among others, to liveContinue reading “10-Aug-20 Abuse in Religious Organisations”

13-July-20 Capital Punishment and Victims

The BBC website reports this morning on the case of Daniel Lewis Lee who will be subject to the first federal execution in the United States in more than 17 years.  Lee and an accomplice were convicted of murdering three members of the same family. Two details stand out in the report.  First, the murdersContinue reading “13-July-20 Capital Punishment and Victims”

21-May-20 Crimmigration

In an interview on Channel 4 News this week, Karolina Gerlich, executive director of The Care Workers’ Charity – and herself a care worker – was interviewed alongside Conservative MP Caroline Nokes about the points-based immigration bill, voted through the House Of Commons on Monday evening.  Immigrants need to be designated ‘skilled workers’ and earnContinue reading “21-May-20 Crimmigration”

19-May-20 Public Inquiries and Scandal

‘Calls for a public inquiry’ is a phrase we hear increasingly.  Early in the pandemic crisis for example, there were demands for inquiries into the Government’s response. Public inquiries are set up to establish disputed facts, determine accountability, restore public confidence… prevent recurrence of events and tak[e] forward public policy” (House of Lords Select CommitteeContinue reading “19-May-20 Public Inquiries and Scandal”

27-Apr-20 Violence Against Women as Torture

I am drawing across two lecture topics delivered this week – torture and violence against women – to raise a question about definitions and power.  What we include in definitions matter; the boundary between what is ‘in’ and what is ’out’ has material impact.  So when we are trying to think critically, we should alwaysContinue reading “27-Apr-20 Violence Against Women as Torture”

20-Apr-20 Terrorist Financing

It is difficult to mount a terrorism operation and certainly to run a terrorist organisation, without people, knowledge and money.  Indeed, there is much in common between licit and illicit organisations.  It’s why both management experts and criminologists have useful insights to offer on organised crime such as county lines, human trafficking operations or theContinue reading “20-Apr-20 Terrorist Financing”

6-Apr-20 Transnational Crimes

Transnational crimes are different from international crimes.  The ‘trans’ prefix (from the Latin meaning ‘across’ or ‘through’) shows us that this refers to crime which is planned, executed or has an impact in more than one country.  ‘International crime’ refers generally to crimes against humanity which may involve two or more countries.  Albanese (2017) identifiesContinue reading “6-Apr-20 Transnational Crimes”

1-Apr-20 Incapacitation

Incapacitation is a method of removing or limiting someone’s freedom such that they cannot commit further crime.  It can be seen also to protect society.  Examples include prison, electronic tagging, restraining orders or the stocks.  For white collar crimes, there is removal of license to practice or a restraint of trade order, for example. Indeed, weContinue reading “1-Apr-20 Incapacitation”

26-Mar-20 Indigenous Criminology

What would I read in Criminology, if I had the luxury of more time?  One area is ‘Indigenous Criminology’ and particularly the work of academic Dr Juan Tauri at the University of Wollongong in Australia. His article, The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House: An Indigenous Critique of Criminology, published in 2018 isContinue reading “26-Mar-20 Indigenous Criminology”